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Culture

How’s this for a Throwback Thursday? The British Aerospace 146 aircraft were part of our fleet from the early days of Air BC and Air Nova in 1988, until they were retired from Jazz in 2005. (📸: Mike Head) #throwbackthursday ...

A stunning shot of one of our Dash 8-400 waiting to take to the skies at @torontopearson 😍. Captured by @yhz_flyer #aircanadaexpress #operatedbyjazz ...

First signs of spring upon arrival into YVR 🌸 (📸: @dmairplane) #aircanadaexpress #operatedbyjazz ...

“Tell me it’s cold outside without telling me it’s cold outside… I’ll go first” – Aaron Dyck, Customer Service Agent, Saskatoon #winterops #aircanadaexpress #operatedbyjazz #airportcustomerservice ...

Meet the person behind @jazzaviationlp! Our Social Media and Special Projects Coordinator, Madison Tiller, was a guest on the @holdingshortmedia podcast this week in honour of International Women’s Day, where she discussed her experience thus far as a communications professional in aviation and her journey to Jazz. Holding Short is a Canadian, female-hosted podcast about “all things aviation and the people that make up this multifaceted industry.” Fun fact: Madison helped design the Holding Short podcast artwork! Swipe up in our stories to listen. ...

We’re proud to have been named one of Canada’s Best Diversity Employers for the tenth consecutive year. It’s an honour to have received this recognition each year for the past decade. Diversity is core to the culture all Jazz employees are proud of – one that values individuality and fosters safe spaces that empower employees to be their authentic selves #Diversity #AwardWinning #TopEmployer

Nous sommes fiers d’avoir été nommés parmi les meilleurs employeurs canadiens pour la diversité pour la dixième année consécutive. C’est un honneur d’avoir obtenu cette distinction chaque année de la dernière décennie. La diversité est au cœur de la culture dont est fier le personnel de Jazz – une culture qui valorise l’individualité et qui favorise la création de milieux sûrs permettant d’être soi-même au travail.
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In honour of Black History Month, we are celebrating the early achievements and contributions made by Black Canadian aviators.

Henry Langdon (left) was born in Trinidad in 1911 and came to Canada in 1923. Growing up in Montreal, he had dreams of being a writer, but enlisted in the RCAF on November 1, 1939 to serve during World War II. At this time the RCAF prohibited the enlistment of People of Colour, but Henry was permitted to enlist (it is speculated that his previous course in aero engine mechanics helped).

After training at the Technical Training School in St. Thomas, Ontario, he served as Leading Aircraftman at multiple training schools and depots. He reached the rank of flight sergeant in October 1944 and was released on September 7, 1945. He was hired by Trans Canada Airlines (Air Canada) as an aero engine mechanic and later become an aircraft inspector with the company. Henry was active with the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAMAW), Lodge 1751, in Montreal.

He was a pioneer with Air Canada, the RCAF and his union. Working in predominantly white environments, he was highly respected not only for his abilities, but in his efforts towards improving race relations. (Source: Royal Canadian Air Force) #blackhistorymonth
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Today is National Aviation Day. While the last year has not been easy for our industry, it has shown the passion, dedication and resilience of those involved in aviation. We are so proud to be a part of Canada’s aviation industry. We will continue to weather this storm together. #aircanadaexpress #operatedbyjazz ...

In honour of Black History Month, we are celebrating the early achievements and contributions made by Black Canadian aviators.

Born in Nova Scotia and raised in New Brunswick, Walter “Wally” Peters enrolled in the Royal Canadian Air Force at 24-years-old. Peters was accepted into the jet pilot training program and completed the course with top honours, becoming the first Canadian-born Black jet fighter pilot.

Based in Saskatchewan, his skills were put to good use as a flying instructor. He flew the C-100 “Canuck” fighter/interceptor in a number of air shows. In the early 1970s he helped organize the famous Snowbirds air demonstration squadron. He flew the CT 114 Tutor jet as a Snowbird for two years. He was the first human rights officer in the RCAF and an advisor to the UN Security Council in New York. He retired from the RCAF with the rank of Major in 1984 and worked until 1988 with Transport Canada.

Many testify to his importance as a role model for both visible minorities and all members of the RCAF. (Source: New Brunswick Black History Society) #blackhistorymonth
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